Uniffors


From the ass to the crapper

Posted in Philip Gilmore Cartoons by uniffors on the November 28th, 2008

The National Security Adviser advises the Peace Adviser.

And no these people are not joking.

Conscience vote

Posted in Philip Gilmore Cartoons by uniffors on the November 28th, 2008

House justice committee members voted down the impeachment complaint. They listened to the word of god.

    “Ipakita natin na ayaw na natin ang nangyayari,” Bishop Antonio Tobias.
    “If we can no longer go through the legal means of seeking the truth, we will be forced to use extra-constitutional or extra-legal means,” - Bishop Deogracias Iňiguez.

By whatever means necessary!

Fire the driver

Posted in Manuel Buencamino by uniffors on the November 26th, 2008

My column in today’s Business Mirror

    Dispatches from the Enchanted Kingdom: Fire the driver

    Opinion
    Written by Manuel Buencamino
    TUESDAY, 25 NOVEMBER 2008

    Let’s grant that those who advocate Charter change love their country as much as those who push for impeachment. Both groups believe the country needs reform, but they disagree on the means.

    Charter changers, like the communists, blame the system. They say we stand a better chance of getting to where we want to go if we change the form of government. Simply put, we’ll get there faster if we had a better car. Impeachers, on the other hand, believe that not even a Rolls Royce will get you there if you have a monkey at the wheel.

    On Sunday I read an article by Patricia Evangelista, a columnist for another daily. It was the story of one Raymond Manalo, a suspected communist sympathizer who was abducted, detained and tortured by the military.

    Here are excerpts from his story:

    “Sometimes, when the soldiers are drinking, they take you out of your cage and play with you. The game varies, but it is usually the same. Two by fours, chains, an open gardening hose shoved down your nose. You crawl back to your cage, on your hands and knees. You wake up to screaming, to the sound of grown men begging, and you wonder which one it is this time. Sometimes, one of your cellmates will disappear. Sometimes, they don’t come back.

    “Then they take you away, and there is a doctor, pills, antibiotics, a bed. They tell you they are taking you home to see your parents. You meet the man they call The Butcher, and he tells you to tell your parents not to join the rallies, to stay away from human-rights groups, that they would ruin your life and your brother’s. He tells you, this small man in shorts, that if you can only prove you’re on his side now, he would let you and your brother live. He gives you a box of vitamins, and tells you that they are expensive: P35 per pill.”

    Thank God for tender mercies.

    But it gets better.

    “And, in April 2007, you hear a woman begging, and when you are ordered to fix dinner, you see Sherlyn, lying naked on a chair that had fallen on the floor, both wrists and one tied leg propped up. You see them hit her with wooden planks, see her electrocuted, beaten, half-drowned. You see them amuse themselves with her body, poke sticks into her vagina, shove a water hose into her nose and mouth. And you see the soldiers’ wives watch.”

    What sort of human being would invite his wife to witness such atrocities; what kind of woman would go and watch her husband dehumanize another woman?

    Torture is now entertainment. How will changing the system without replacing the one who called a torturer “my hero” stop human-rights abuses? Charter change will be nothing more than putting a different gun in the hands of monsters.

    There is a direct link between human-rights abuses and corruption. One flows from the other. Human-rights abuses become rampant when people impoverished by unabated corruption begin to demand reforms. Free speech is curtailed through intimidation; discontent and dissent are suppressed through extrajudicial detentions, disappearances and killings.

    Will Charter change put a dent on corruption if the same crooks remain on the driver’s seat?

    Corruption is the ugly part of human nature. It can never be totally eliminated unless you want to eliminate all humans. The most one can hope for is to keep corruption at a minimum. But that does not mean we adopt Romulo Neri’s fatalistic philosophy of “moderating greed.”

    Instead, we need to make sure everybody understands that those who steal are guaranteed severe punishment. That’s the only way to raise the cost-benefit ratio of corruption.

    Asking crooks to amend the Charter so they can hang on to their position is like buying a new car instead of firing a reckless driver. Let’s change the driver before we even begin to think about tinkering with the car because, more often than not, the problem is with the driver and not the car.

    Impeaching Gloria Arroyo is a more effective game changer than changing the system but keeping everyone in place.

Street Fighting Man(Rolling Stones)

    Everywhere I hear the sound of marching, charging feet, boy
    cause summers here and the time is right for fighting in the street, boy
    But what can a poor boy do
    Except to sing for a rock n roll band
    cause in sleepy london town
    Theres just no place for a street fighting man
    No

    Hey! think the time is right for a palace revolution
    But where I live the game to play is compromise solution
    Well, then what can a poor boy do
    Except to sing for a rock n roll band
    cause in sleepy london town
    Theres no place for a street fighting man
    No

    Hey! said my name is called disturbance
    Ill shout and scream, Ill kill the king, Ill rail at all his servants
    Well, what can a poor boy do
    Except to sing for a rock n roll band
    cause in sleepy london town
    Theres no place for a street fighting man
    No

Biro lang

Posted in Philip Gilmore Cartoons by uniffors on the November 25th, 2008
    “GMA’s critics claim that she is so unpopular and her endorsement or association is a kiss of death to a politician’s reelection. Do you think if that is true, these congressmen will put their careers on the line to extend a supposedly unpopular president?” Mikey Arroyo

One congressman may have a special reason for putting everything on the line

Isang bobo na nagmamarunong

Posted in Manuel Buencamino by uniffors on the November 24th, 2008

Deputy Palace spokesman Anthony Golez is a licensed physician who prefers to work as a mouthpiece. Nothing wrong with that, specially if you think you’re good with words. And there lies the rub.

Here, in this Palace press release, is Golez at his best.

Commenting on revelations made by former Speaker De Venecia in his soon to be launched biographu, Golez said:

Golez scoffed at the claim of ousted House Speaker Jose de Venecia Jr. in his auto-biography regarding the cancelled National Broadcasting Network-ZTE deal.

A portion of De Venecia’s autobiography, which was printed by a Philippine national daily today, touched on an alleged meeting at the ZTE headquarters in Shenzhen, China in which the President and the First Gentleman were present.

But Golez dismissed the former speaker’s claim, saying it “will not hold water.” “Madali pong gumawa ng auto-biography ng kahit na sinong tao.” He added.

In his autobiography, De Venecia said that “as always, the First Gentleman said hardly a word.”

Golez said that if De Venecia’s autobiography is “going to be used as evidence for any intention or motivation, it will not hold water. It is hearsay, dahil ito ay isang kwento lang.

“It has to be appreciated by the courts. Only then can we call it a biography of the truth — otherwise it would be mere science fiction,” he said.

released 11/23/2008

Note: “it will not hold water. It is hearsay, dahil ito ay isang kwento lang…”

The first thing the physician cum spokesman has to learn is how to use a dictionary. Any dictionary will tell Golez that De Venecia’s account is only hearsay if he had heard it from another person and then told it to someone else. Eyewitness account ito ni De Venecia. He was there, he saw, he heard. So it is not hearsay.

Isang torpeng nagmamarunong yan si Golez.

RAGE

Posted in Brownman's Posts by uniffors on the November 23rd, 2008

Patricia Evangelista paints a portrait of Gloria’s hero. Gen. Jovito Palparan (Ret.) as seen through the eyes of his victims.

    Rebel without a clue
    Rage
    By Patricia Evangelista
    Philippine Daily Inquirer
    11/23/2008
    Most Read
    THIS is the story of one Raymond Manalo, farmer, who disappeared on Feb. 14, 2006 with his older brother from their farm in San Ildefonso, Bulacan. Manalo was neither activist nor rebel when he disappeared. He escaped more than two years later. He says there are many, many more like him.

    * * *

    They put you in a cage four feet by one foot small, the height of an average man. There are hollow blocks to the side and iron grills in front. You sit with three other men, crouched in a line. There is no other way to fit.

    Your brother is in the same cell. The door opens, more of them come in. More of them like you—beaten, bruised, helpless. They are put inside the next cell. This time there are two men and a married couple. The woman has burns all over her body. She was raped, they tell you. She was raped and beaten until she soiled herself. They say she has gone mad. They take her away.

    This is where you shit, where you piss, where you wash if you still care. You do not feel the wind; you do not see the sun. Your food comes rarely, and what comes is rotten, leftover pig feed. Three men arrive, from Nueva Ecija. They are tortured. One of them has both arms broken. Bleeding.

    Sometimes, when the soldiers are drinking, they take you out of your cage and play with you. The game varies, but it is usually the same. Two by fours, chains, an open gardening hose shoved down your nose. You crawl back to your cage, on your hands and knees. You wake up to screaming, to the sound of grown men begging, and you wonder which one it is this time. Sometimes, one of your cellmates will disappear. Sometimes, they don’t come back.

    Then they take you away, and there is a doctor, pills, antibiotics, a bed. They tell you they are taking you home to see your parents. You meet the man they call The Butcher, and he tells you to tell your parents not to join the rallies, to stay away from human rights groups, that they would ruin your life and your brother’s. He tells you, this small man in shorts, that if you can only prove you’re on his side now, he would let you and your brother live. He gives you a box of vitamins, and tells you that they are expensive: P35 per pill.

    They put a chain around your waist. The military surround your farm. Your mother opens the front door crying, and hugs you. You tell them what you were told to say. You hand them the money Palparan told you to give. Then you are told you must go.

    Always, you keep thinking of escape. You make yourself useful, to make them trust you. You cook. You wash cars. You clean. You shop. No task is too menial. And one day, while you sweep the floor, you see a young woman, chained to the foot of a bed. Her name is Sherlyn Cadapan, she tells you, Sports Science, University of the Philippines Diliman, the same Sherlyn who disappeared from Hagonoy, Bulacan on June 26, 2006. She says she has been raped.

    Later, you meet Karen Empeño, also from UP, and Manuel Merino, the farmer who rushed to save the two girls when they were abducted. Karen and Sherlyn are in charge of washing the soldiers’ clothes, you and Manuel and your brother Reynaldo wash the car and carry water and cook.

    The five of you are taken from camp to camp. You see the soldiers stealing from villagers. You see them bringing in blindfolded captives. You see them digging graves. You see them burning bodies, pouring gasoline as the fire rose. You see them shoot old men sitting on carabaos and see them push bodies into ravines. And in April 2007, you hear a woman begging, and when you are ordered to fix dinner, you see Sherlyn, lying naked on a chair that had fallen on the floor, both wrists and one tied leg propped up.

    You see them hit her with wooden planks, see her electrocuted, beaten, half-drowned. You see them amuse themselves with her body, poke sticks into her vagina, shove a water hose into her nose and mouth. And you see the soldiers wives’ watch. You hear the soldiers forcing Sherlyn to admit who it was with plans to “write a letter.” You hear her admit, after intense torture, that it was Karen’s idea. And you see Karen, dragged out of her cell, tied at the wrists and ankles, stripped of her clothing, then beaten, water-tortured, and burned with cigarettes and raped with pieces of wood. And it is you who are ordered to wash their clothes the next day, and who finds blood in their panties.

    And you are there, on the night they take away Manuel Merino, when you hear an old man moaning, a gunshot and the red light of a sudden fire.

    * * *

    The day Raymond Manalo and his brother Reynaldo escaped was the day he promised himself they would pay, all of them who tortured Karen and Sherlyn, who killed so many, who tortured him and his brother until they begged and pleaded. They were pigs, he says, those men were pigs. If he escaped, they told him, and if they couldn’t find him, they would massacre his family. And if they do not answer to the courts here, they will answer to God.

    They can still kill him, he says. But even if they do, it is too late. He’s told his story.

Hold the flowers, it was only a shitstorm

Posted in Manuel Buencamino,Philip Gilmore Cartoons by uniffors on the November 22nd, 2008

Mike is back in Manila. Gloria continued her journey to Peru…after a long hot shower.

A scary thought

Posted in Manuel Buencamino by uniffors on the November 21st, 2008

The Senate President is third in the line of succession. Juan Ponce Enrile is Senate President.

I keep reminding myself, “Don’t worry, it’s highly unlikely something could happen to Gloria and Noli.” But then I keep hearing this little voice telling me, “Stranger things have happened.”

Johnny shows ‘em he’s still up to the job

Posted in Philip Gilmore Cartoons by uniffors on the November 21st, 2008

Clueless and inept

Posted in Manuel Buencamino by uniffors on the November 20th, 2008

When Jocelyn Bolante cleared Gloria, I thought he only made things worse….

    Dispatches from the Enchanted Kingdom:
    Clueless and inept

    Written by Manuel Buencamino
    Business Mirror, Opinion, TUESDAY, 18 NOVEMBER 2008

    Members of the Senate blue-ribbon committee were incredulous when Jocelyn Bolante testified that Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo had no knowledge of the P728-million fertilizer-fund scam.

    They asked, how could a micro-manager not know?

    Of course she didn’t know. A micromanager spends so much time sweating over small stuff, big things are overlooked.

    Gloria Arroyo is clueless and her subalterns love it. They fed undisturbed on Impsa, the Diosdado Macapagal Boulevard, Piatco, Northrail, ZTE/NBN, Quedancor, the fertilizer scam, Mt. Diwalwal, protection money from smugglers, drug dealers and jueteng lords, and a whole slew of assorted criminal activities because Gloria was busy cutting ribbons, checking on the prices of commodities in public markets and handing out P500 Katas ng VAT dividends to poor communities.

    There are many examples of subalterns doing things behind Gloria’s back.

    A witness in the Senate investigation on the Garci tapes testified that, during the 2004 campaign, at a dinner Gloria Arroyo hosted for Commission on Elections employees, a certain Lilia Pineda distributed envelopes to the guests after Gloria left the room.

    The same thing happened at a meeting in Malacañang after Roel Pulido filed his two-page impeachment complaint. A Palace operative gave gift bags to congressmen and local officials after Mrs. Arroyo left the room.

    Gloria witnessed the signing of the NBN-ZTE deal only to cancel it after she, in the words of her former spokesman Ignacio Bunye, “learned of the slightest sign of impropriety attending the deal.”

    She thought peace was at hand when she sent her people to sign the memorandum of agreement on ancestral domain with the Moro Islamic Liberation Front. Little did she know, because she didn’t read the agreement, that the peace accord was a bill of goods. Her subsequent decision to reverse course led to the loss of lives and property in the war-torn areas of the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao.

    In one of her State of the Nation Addresses, she praised Gen. Jovito Palparan (ret.). A few years later, the Supreme Court confirmed what human- rights advocates had been telling her all along: Her hero was involved in the abduction, illegal detention and torture of two brothers suspected of being sympathizers or members of the New People’s Army.

    Maybe I should feel sorry for Mrs. Arroyo and her family, especially her husband. That poor, recovering heart patient, an honorable and charitable man, according to his lawyer, gets blamed for everything when all he wants to do is distribute dentures to those who have nothing to eat. (I know it sounds like donating running shoes to amputees, but, hey, it’s the purity of intention that counts.)

    As I was saying, maybe I should feel sorry for Gloria Arroyo. But I don’t.

    We can pretend she’s not personally corrupt or responsible for human-rights violations, but we can’t deny that it’s her responsibility to put a stop to those activities and to hold perpetrators accountable.

    Bolante did not clear Gloria Arroyo; he proved she was clueless and inept, incapable of running a government free from corruption and human- rights abuses.

    That’s why I don’t understand why her aides were so happy about “the clarification made during the hearing that President Arroyo had no hand in the controversy by way of approval of fund releases or implementation of the fertilizer program.” What kind of people would make a virtue out of cluelessness and ineptitude?

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